Greek invisibility spells: Papyri Graecae Magicae

PGM I. 222-31

Indispensable invisibility spell: Take fat or an eye of a nightowl and a ball of dung rolled by a beetle and oil of an unripe olive and grind them all together until smooth, and smear your whole
body with it and say to Helios: “I adjure you by your great name, BORKÊ PHOIOUR IÕ ZIZIA APARXEOUCH THTHE LALIAM AAAAAA IIIII OOOO IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ NAUNAX AI AI AEÕ AEÕ EAÕ,” and moisten it and say in addition: “Make me invisible, lord Helios, AEÕ ÕAÊ EIÊ ÊAÕ,
in the presence of any man until sunset, IÕ IÕ Õ PHRIXRIZÕ EÕA.”

PGM I. 247-62

Tested spell for invisibility: A great work. Take an eye of an ape or of a corpse that has died a violent death and plant a peony. Rub these with oil of lily, and as you are rubbing
them from the right to the left, say the spell as follows: “I am ANUBIS, I am OSIR-PHRE, I am OSOT SORONOUIER, I am OSIRIS whom SETH destroyed. Rise up infernal daimon, IÕ ERBETH IÕ PHOBETH IÕ PAKERBETH IÕ APOMPS; whatever I, NN, order you to do
be obedient to me.” And if you wish to become invisible, rub just your face with the concoction, and you will be invisible for as long as you wish. And if you wish to be visible again, move from west to east and say this name, and you will be obvious and visible to all
men.
The name is: MARMARIAÕTH MARMARIPHEGGE, make me, NN, visible to all men on this day, immediately, immediately; quickly, quickly!” This works very well.

Helios and chariot , 4th century BCE relief from Athena’s temple, Ilium. 


Works Cited
Betz, H. D. (1996). The Greek magical papyri in translation: Including the Demotic spells. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book Review: Summoning Spirits: The Art of Magical Evocation

I wanted this book ever since I was a boy. I was a little disappointed. Would have been a good read at age 15 instead of 31.

The serious and challenging subject of summoning spirits is unfortunately handled here only at the surface level. Most of the book includes a primer on the history of scrying and magical evocation, especially the work of John Dee and Edward Kelly, followed by some visualization exercises for beginner’s work in the Astral. This is followed by only the most basic information about the tools and rituals of the Order of the G∴D∴, offering all of the flashy elements of dramatic ritual but none of the esoteric meaning behind them.

I mean, this is just Magic 101.

The act of summoning spirits, however, is not a “beginner’s” hobby, and requires years of study and spiritual discipline. This book doesn’t even begin to cover summoning on the Astral until page 129 (there are only 209 pages total). One interesting part was Konstantinos’ writing on tulpas, which here he calls egregores. The ideas and rituals mentioned here are quite useful. All in all the book works well as a handbook for a more experienced or well-read magician, but is a bad idea for a novice. Novices will do better reading Modern Magick and Liber Null & Psychonaut first.

N.B. after finishing the book I will be attempting to make a tulpa which I failed to do at my first attempt in 2013. It will be interesting to see if my abilities have grown since then or if I’m just deluding myself, ha!

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic, Boscastle

The fishing village of Boscastle, in the southwest of England, contains a wildly unique privately owned museum dedicated to the history of witchcraft and magic in England. The collection includes over 3,000 objects and 7,000 books and manuscripts. Founded by Cecil Williamson, the museum also lays a claim to fame through their resident witch in those early days, William Gardner himself, who founded modern Wicca and led a cultural revival of folk magic in Britain. The museum has been known in its current form since the 1960’s and has become a site of magical pilgrimage for witches in the present day.

Objects include artifacts from the time of Roman occupation up to the present day, including items of particular interest from the original OTO/A.’.A and Golden Dawn systems. There is currently an exhibit ongoing that highlights ritual tools and artifacts of the 19th/20th century high ceremonial currents of magick. Looks very intriguing. 

Very interesting to me personally is their research journal, The Enquiring EyeThe Enquiring Eye, which features academic level research topics on magic and witchcraft.
Go visit them! 







All images courtesy of The Museum of Witchcraft and Magic, Boscastle. Used with permission.

Hermetically Open

Very soon, 3500 manuscripts from the Ritman Library  will be digitally available, thanks in part to the support of Da Vinci Code author Dan Brown. This project is going to be a huge resource for research and new historical perspectives of Magic.

This part of the Hermetically Open Projects is aimed at digitizing the available sources in the library, both text and image. Part of the added value of this project lies in the online availability of works that are not generally accessible, easy to find or share, and are exclusively kept in a physical form. In the following years, the online catalogue of The Ritman Library will be upgraded, and all digitized content will be made available via our online catalogue.

Learn more at the Ritman Library

Herbal Riot

A Scrapbook of Sin

Unearthly Delights

A Scrapbook of Sin

The Occult Gallery

A Scrapbook of Sin

Mirrors at Home..

A Scrapbook of Sin

Memento Mori

A Scrapbook of Sin

𖦹

A Scrapbook of Sin

Death & Mysticism

A Scrapbook of Sin

A Scrapbook of Sin

BLACK GOAT

A Scrapbook of Sin