“To Hoodoo a Man’s Nature”

This goes out to all the girls and boys with a man who can’t keep his cock to himself, excerpt from Catherine Yronwode’s Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic: A Materia Magica of African-American Conjure & Traditional Formulary Giving the Spiritual Uses of Natural Herbs, Roots, Minerals, & Zoological Curios

To Hoodoo a Man’s Nature:
If a man you love is running around and won’t be faithful, take the MEASURE of his penis while he is hard, transferring the MEASURE to a STRING. Wipe the STRING with his SEMEN, then tie nine knots in it. To tie the knots, make the start of a knot at the center of the STRING, then call his name. When he replies, pull the knot tight. Do this for each knot, on nine separate days. The order in which the knots are tied is this:

—9—7—5—3—1—2—4—6—8—

Keep this knotted MEASURE-STRING in a red flannel bag dressed with Stay With Me Oil. If you hate the man and want to destroy his sex life, roll his MEASURE in RED PEPPER powder and CROSSING OIL, then use it as a wick and hand-form a black penis-shaped candle around it. Dress the candle with Crossing Oil, light the wick and let it burn all the way out.

The Fall of the Rebel Angels: Les Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

The Limbourg brothers (who likely died of plague) were famous for their inventive use of bold colors, including the blue featured in this folio, which was actually made from dust of lapis lazuli in gum arabic.



“Him the Almighty Power
Hurled headlong flaming from th’ ethereal sky
With hideous ruin and combustion down
To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
In adamantine chains and penal fire,
Who durst defy th’ Omnipotent to arms.”
– John Milton, Paradise Lost

Clavis Inferni – 18th Century Hogwash?

This 18th century grimoire on black magic is attributed to St. Cyprian, the north African Berber bishop of late antiquity who was definitely no magician (or the Grecian mage who was stolen by Christianity?). The text is presented in macaronic Latin, Hebrew and trans. fluvii hijacked from Agrippa (XVI CE). It is also said to belong to the famed Black School of Wittenburg, but who has said that remains unclear. Taking a brief look at the drawings and texts, and given the unknown origin and author, my best guess is that his book is a total fraud—a showpiece for some eccentric collector to flash at parties to create an allure. The text does contain pretty straightforward content, but none of it is really original. If this is a genuine grimoire, it is useless! There are no contemporary references to the document at all, which gives me pause. There is a promising book about this grimoire and Cyprian’s magic I might try to pick up.

The only thing that strikes me is the use of Olympian sigils. Aratron, Bethor, Phaleg, Haggith, Ophiel. I honestly don’t see many grimoires that use them.
In his right hand he held seven stars, from his mouth came a sharp two-edged sword, and his face was like the sun shining in full strength.

 

“The great binding.” Is this an allegory? Is this a completed act?  “The end crowns the work”

Book Review – Plants of the Devil

An interesting and poetic take on the relationship between humans and plants that can harm as well as heal. More interesting however is the way in which folklore has associated many of these plants with the powers of evil—not only poisons but helpful plants have been maligned because of traditional uses by the cunning folk. The author, Corinne Boyer, invites you to explore your own relationship with these plants, learning from them not only through praxis but also meditative contemplation of their lives and spirits.

Book Review – The Satanic Scriptures

The gallant, haughty style of writing that made Dr. Anton LaVey infamous is very much present in his disciple and successor Magus Peter H. Gilmore. The Church of Satan’s penchant for showmanship and dramatics (part of what made the Church and LaVey so well known) makes itself visible in this collection of assorted writings that have brought the Church into the 21st century. When you get past all the pompous vocabulary, you reach the heart of the message of the Church of Satan: Do It Yourself, Asshole. A good read that will enlighten you on many of the misconceptions and misgivings many have about Satanism.

Greek invisibility spells: Papyri Graecae Magicae

PGM I. 222-31

Indispensable invisibility spell: Take fat or an eye of a nightowl and a ball of dung rolled by a beetle and oil of an unripe olive and grind them all together until smooth, and smear your whole
body with it and say to Helios: “I adjure you by your great name, BORKÊ PHOIOUR IÕ ZIZIA APARXEOUCH THTHE LALIAM AAAAAA IIIII OOOO IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ IEÕ NAUNAX AI AI AEÕ AEÕ EAÕ,” and moisten it and say in addition: “Make me invisible, lord Helios, AEÕ ÕAÊ EIÊ ÊAÕ,
in the presence of any man until sunset, IÕ IÕ Õ PHRIXRIZÕ EÕA.”

PGM I. 247-62

Tested spell for invisibility: A great work. Take an eye of an ape or of a corpse that has died a violent death and plant a peony. Rub these with oil of lily, and as you are rubbing
them from the right to the left, say the spell as follows: “I am ANUBIS, I am OSIR-PHRE, I am OSOT SORONOUIER, I am OSIRIS whom SETH destroyed. Rise up infernal daimon, IÕ ERBETH IÕ PHOBETH IÕ PAKERBETH IÕ APOMPS; whatever I, NN, order you to do
be obedient to me.” And if you wish to become invisible, rub just your face with the concoction, and you will be invisible for as long as you wish. And if you wish to be visible again, move from west to east and say this name, and you will be obvious and visible to all
men.
The name is: MARMARIAÕTH MARMARIPHEGGE, make me, NN, visible to all men on this day, immediately, immediately; quickly, quickly!” This works very well.

Helios and chariot , 4th century BCE relief from Athena’s temple, Ilium. 


Works Cited
Betz, H. D. (1996). The Greek magical papyri in translation: Including the Demotic spells. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book Review: Summoning Spirits: The Art of Magical Evocation

I wanted this book ever since I was a boy. I was a little disappointed. Would have been a good read at age 15 instead of 31.

The serious and challenging subject of summoning spirits is unfortunately handled here only at the surface level. Most of the book includes a primer on the history of scrying and magical evocation, especially the work of John Dee and Edward Kelly, followed by some visualization exercises for beginner’s work in the Astral. This is followed by only the most basic information about the tools and rituals of the Order of the G∴D∴, offering all of the flashy elements of dramatic ritual but none of the esoteric meaning behind them.

I mean, this is just Magic 101.

The act of summoning spirits, however, is not a “beginner’s” hobby, and requires years of study and spiritual discipline. This book doesn’t even begin to cover summoning on the Astral until page 129 (there are only 209 pages total). One interesting part was Konstantinos’ writing on tulpas, which here he calls egregores. The ideas and rituals mentioned here are quite useful. All in all the book works well as a handbook for a more experienced or well-read magician, but is a bad idea for a novice. Novices will do better reading Modern Magick and Liber Null & Psychonaut first.

N.B. after finishing the book I will be attempting to make a tulpa which I failed to do at my first attempt in 2013. It will be interesting to see if my abilities have grown since then or if I’m just deluding myself, ha!