Leonardo & The Hermit

Alec Falle Hamilton recently shared this drawing which was inspired by the spirit(s) of the magic mushroom. “I asked the mushrooms how I could honor their spirit with a single drawing. Their answer came back immediately… ‘It’s all One line’. Here’s Leonardo Da Vinci and the Hermit, drawn without lifting my pen from the paper, made up entirely of mushrooms.”

credit: Alec Falle Hamilton, used with permission


This resonates so deeply with my own mushroom experiences, which often hurtle me back and forth between the past and future, with icons like Leonardo and other Renaissance figures giving my inspiration through their work. Leonardo has always represented to me the greatest mind humanity has ever offered: one whose inquisitive nature lead him to define new art forms, mechanisms and ideas that were centuries ahead of his time.
The Hermit is of equal importance in his quest for interior silence. Becoming a spiritually minded person often means separating oneself from society in order to deepen the relationship of the individual with nature and his own self.
These are all values upheld by the mushroom spirit.

See more of Hamilton’s art at their website and Instagram

Comet Observations – The Augsburger Book of Miracles, 1552

The Augsburger Wunderzeichenbuch (1552 ?) was a compendium of famous meteorological and astronomical phenomena  as well as selected illustrations from the Bible. The more interesting part here is that the writer associates the various comet appearances with specific disasters (disaster literally meaning an ill-starred event) in world history. In this work, the author does not make the distinction between comets and meteors which we do today. The segment on miraculous signs appears between the Old and New Testament portions and depicts several freak weather incidents and celestial apparitions from antiquity up to the year 1552.

“In 1401 A.D., a big comet with a tail… appeared in the sky in Germany. That was followed by a great, terrible plague in Swabia.”
The great comet of 1456 was actually excommunicated by Pope Callixtus III. Today we know this as Halley’s Comet. I’m not entirely sure what the smaller object is but it cannot be a comet since comet tails always face away from the sun. This must be a shooting star.
“In 1007 a wondrous comet appeared. It gave off fire and flames in every direction. It was seen in Germany and Welschland and it fell onto the earth.” This was then not a true comet but an impressive meteor.
“In 1546, in the month of August, the fire from the sky struck a tower in which were more than four hundred tons of powder, in Mechel in Niederland. And exactly half of the city burned down, which is also a special sign from God.”
The comet of 1300/1, most likely Halley’s comet again.

 

Roman Gods, Livre des échecs amoureux moralisés (1496)

Le Livre des échecs amoureux moralisés. Commissioned by Louise of Savoy. Transferred between 1515-1518 to the royal library of Blois. “The games of Love”, masterfully composed and filled with moral stories against foolish love, whose end (the book claims) is to show the error and deception that is fatuous love and its innumerable dangers.
Currently located at La Bibliothèque nationale de France. See it in full detail here.

Pluto and Proserpina among the Kingdom of Hades


Vulcan and Venus, her children


Pan


Jupiter


Saturn eating his young

Artist Spotlight – Scurvy Drunkard (Pt 2)

I remain ever impressed by this gal’s work, especially this time around. S.D. continues to produce excellently creative projects which explore the dark side of psychology, decay, madness, and fear. I just…love her! She has just published a photo series called Beautiful Corpses. Make sure to click on the images below to enlarge and take in all the details. I love the color choices and the contrasts. Follow her Instagram @scurvydrunkard

Beautiful Corpses

The obsession
with possession-
the utmost pointless pursuit.
The compulsive urge to preserve
these THINGS which can be seen
felt, or heard.
A washboard must be attained
Guzzling eggs, a dozen a day.
Perhaps a home to die in,
if you can find a way to pay.
Everything, in excess.
Perhaps some-body to display.
The borrowed land you call your own
will also waste away.
You have cried from the hunger
since the day you were born.
Reduced yourself to but a number
insatiably seeking to adorn
the skin you’re living in
always seeking outward things
when one could truly make their mark
if only one would look within.
If only one would look within.
All material traces, forgot
Blood oaths will clot
And the flesh will rot
The flesh will rot.